My Russian remedies for cold

Many years ago in Russia, I got sick. My American friend recommended to rest and make my family to cook some chicken soup for me. It sounded really funny at that time. I didn’t see any connection between flu and chicken soup. After relocating to the US, I’ve learned that this is a very popular way to treat your cold. …cold or flu? To be honest I’ve never knew the difference between them. I had to look up online. 

So,

… the main difference is that the flu is caused by different types of viruses than the common cold.  Flu symptoms are usually much worse than cold symptoms, and they appear suddenly. The most common flu symptoms are fever, cough, sore throat, runny nose, head and body aches. Colds are usually associated with a sore throat and runny nose. And cold symptoms usually appear gradually…

About a week ago I caught a cold. Now I know it was  a cold (not flu). My husband was away on a business trip. So I wasn’t expecting any chicken soup. And  I had to remember some Russian home remedies for colds.

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Pickled beets

October is a time of shorter days, beautiful foliage, strong wind, pouring rain, cool temperature. And time of picking up the vegetables from your garden. 

If you like pickled beets this post is for you.

I didn’t like beets too much. But while living in the US I started to eat them with my husband. He asked me to pickle them. That’s why  I searched for a recipe. 

Eventually, I got the one  from my Russian friend, Mom of three daughters, lovable wife, and a blogger@mama_natasha_gotovit

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Pizzelles and my travel experience

Time to time I bake pizzelles. Pizzelles are traditional Italian waffle cookies, as Google says.

I like them. They are easy to make, remind me Russian waffles and go very well with coffee at work.

Every time when I think of them, I remember a funny story happened to me.

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Sorrel – grass or soup ingredient?

Sorrel is in season. But what is it?

Wikipedia says: “Common sorrel or garden sorrel (Rumex acetosa), often simply called sorrel, is a perennial herb in the family Polygonaceae. Other names for sorrel include spinach dock and narrow-leaved dock. It is a common plant in grassland habitats and is cultivated as a garden herb or salad vegetable (pot herb)”.

Sorrel - ingredient of Russian Green Soup

Sorrel looks something similar to spinach, but the taste is very different. It is extremely  sour. Sorrel contains many nutrients. There are a number of vitamins: A, C, K, B1, B2, PP, E. Sorrel is saturated with trace elements. These are iron, potassium, copper, manganese, magnesium, nickel, sodium, fluorine and zinc.

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Spring, Maslenitsa, Blini

Why is Spring associated with blini (Russian-style pancakes) for Russians? Just because in Spring they eat a lot of blini.

Russian pancakes, also known as blini or blinchiki, are really special for people raised in Russia. Blini are a really important part of Russian culture as they are a pearl of Russian cuisine.

            Blini are much wider and thinner than American-style pancakes, but not as thin and wide as crepes. It allows you to stuff them with everything you like; such as ground-beef, ham, cheese, and salmon. You also can eat them with caviar, sour cream, jam, chocolate cream, honey, condense milk, berries, or other sweets.

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My traditional New Year’s salad

I think that in every country and every family there is a traditional New Year’s menu.

In Russia, Olivier salad is not losing its leading position. People even formed an association: if Olivier is on the table, then we celebrate the New Year. There are many recipes for this salad. In every family it is delicious and unique.

The original version of the salad was invented in the 1860s by French cook Lucien Olivier, the chef of the Hermitage, one of Moscow’s restaurants. Olivier’s salad quickly became popular with Hermitage regulars, and became the restaurant’s signature dish. It is known that the salad contained grouse, veal tongue, caviar, lettuce, crayfish tails, capers, and smoked duck, although it is possible that the recipe was varied seasonally. The original Olivier dressing was a type of mayonnaise, made with French wine vinegar, mustard, and Provençal olive oil; its exact recipe, however, remains unknown.

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“Herring under a fur coat”

“Herring under a fur coat” is a popular Russian salad of salted herring and vegetables.  About the mid 70-es of the last century the salad became a traditional dish for the New Year and holiday tables.

Salads with ingredients typical of “Herring  under a fur  Coat”, were distributed in the first half of the 19th century in Scandinavian and German kitchens, and were called “herring salad”. The author of Russian variant of the salad is a merchant Anastas Bogomilov, who owned several pubs in Moscow. Drunken fights happened very often at those pubs. Then he decided to come up with a dish, that would be nourishing and unite different segments of the population. His chef, Aristarkh Prokoptsev, put together salted herring, which symbolized the proletariat, potatoes which symbolized the peasantry, beets symbolized red color of the Bolshevik flag. The name of a new salad was “Shuba”, an acronym for “Shovinismu I Upadku – Boikot I Anafema”, what means “Death and Damnation to Shavinism and Degradation. “Shuba” was served for the first time on the Eve of 1919 New Year. Continue reading ““Herring under a fur coat””

Homemade Moisturizing Face Masks

Moisturizing is an important procedure in General skin care. From lack of moisture the skin becomes flabby, loses its elasticity, wrinkles appear. Moisturizing face masks play an important role in the process of moisturizing the skin. With age, moisturizing facial masks become more relevant.

If you think that the skin looks flabby, there is a feeling of tightness, you can try to make a moisturizing facial mask. Continue reading “Homemade Moisturizing Face Masks”

How to return to childhood?

Probably each of us from time to time wants to return to childhood. How to do that? Well, in my case just cook fish according to my Mom’s recipe.

What do you need?
  • Pollock
  • Flour, mixed with salt and black pepper (last time I used Bread Crumbs)
  • Vegetable oil
  • Onion

*number of ingredients according to your desire Continue reading “How to return to childhood?”