Fallen Сhristmas tree

...Inspired by Tatiana Spirina-Smetana .

I just wanted to translate Tatiana Spirina-Smatana’s post, but I failed to do so. Here’s what I got.

Natasha woke up at 4 o’clock. It’s legal to sleep until 4 pm on January 1.

Especially after the races of preparation for the New Year.

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Russians must do/have for the New Year celebration

If the grocery store cashier gives you candy, the houses are decorated, crowds of shoppers are attacking the stores (at least before the pandemic), the Manager is humming a Christmas songs, a colleague is ordering Hallmark movies about Christmas, parents are checking out Christmas books and movies for kids, a colleague is signing up a family  for covid-19 test for a family gathering (nowadays), all this means the christmas is around the corner. 

What am I doing? I’m looking forward to the New Year.

Firstly, because Orthodox Christmas falls on January 7.

Secondly, I am used to celebrating the New Year.

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